Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Setting the record straight. West Bend 820
#1
Since some don't want information and want to make it about something else I have removed the content. Have a nice day.
Reply
#2
Video 
Light weight 820 piston
.jpg   DSCN9562.JPG (Size: 817.18 KB / Downloads: 36)
Reply
#3
I am glad to find out after only 30+ years of playing with 820's that they have been run completely wrong. Guess I will ditch the oil clutches on those step cranks and replace with dry ones. Throw away the expansion chambers I made for them back then and quit reving to 13,200. Now I find it is unsafe above 12,500, sure dont want to blow them up. Maybe buy a pair of old GEM mufflers. You know they sound so sweet on the motors.

Sure hope I dont find out that boring out the chrome and relining with cast iron sleeves doesnt work either. That would really bum me out.
Reply
#4
(07-16-2020, 11:52 PM)Tom Smith Wrote: Light weight 820 piston

Tom, Is that a std piston that has been machined out?

(07-17-2020, 04:01 AM)Terry Bentley Wrote: I am glad to find out after only 30+ years of playing with 820's that they have been run completely wrong. Guess I will ditch the oil clutches on those step cranks and replace with dry ones. Throw away the expansion chambers I made for them back then and quit reving to 13,200. Now I find it is unsafe above 12,500, sure dont want to blow them up. Maybe buy a pair of old GEM mufflers. You know they sound so sweet on the motors.

Sure hope I dont find out that boring out the chrome and relining with cast iron sleeves doesnt work either. That would really bum me out.

Terry, Steve is talking about the engines that are being built with the parts available TODAY. My new 820 from a reputable engine builder lasted 5 events not being turned over 11,500 on 10 oz per gal castor. Crank had wear spot and it broke the rod.
Reply
#5
Amen to what Steve says. I don't run 820's, but 610's. They DO have the lighter piston, but everything else measures the same. They turn 12,500 all day, and mine aren't leaned down as much as they should be. The light piston means I'm not gouging the crankpin. I run 10 and sometimes 11 OZ pure castor. I can't comment on the wet clutch harming the keyway on the stepped crank, but I have had no issue with either Max Torque or Rev Grip clutches on the stepped crank. Anyhow, aside from the friction advantage of the single ring piston, There will be no difference in speed between a MODIFIED 50 year old 820 and a brand new 820. The numbers are the same. I DO believe that ring friction is a big deal, but that's a matter of switching pistons. I will run .024 ring pistons until I can't find any more. The single ring Arias that Louie Figone was having made was a good unit. I had one in one of the Nikasil bore 610's. No static compression, but it ran well at both ends of the track. I completely respect Rob and Bob disallowing the new block at TBO. That's a matter of keeping the base engines true vintage. I see no advantage to the new block anywhere else, aside from strength. Ted
Reply
#6
when you guys figure out the concern is the carb size, not the motor,,,then you can continue..its 1 inch in one 820 class and .810 in another....the 1 in carb is the issue, not the motor...

and its nothing yet,,,its being discussed,,,,

gw
Reply
#7
Did I say I love these engines. It's why I have so many. I love the robust build and the larger bolts used in all the necessary places. I have heard this conversation for years. It doesn't matter if you agree or not. It's basic information for the average person that may not have the correct information. Everyone can have their approach to how they want to run any engine.
Reply
#8
(07-17-2020, 10:44 AM)steve welte Wrote: Did I say I love these engines. It's why I have so many. I love the robust build and the larger bolts used in all the necessary places. I have heard this conversation for years. It doesn't matter if you agree or not. It's basic information for the average person that may not have the correct information. Everyone can have their approach to how they want to run any engine.

I guess you can do that if you pay absolutely no attention to guidelines,,,yeah I know,,,as some do...LOL

I guess at NHRA events you can run a NEW LSX against a 283 with a carb on it,,,,,in the same class..




GW
Reply
#9
Well,
I am a Mac guy and in my opinion, the 820 does not belong in the Sportsman rear class.
The pro built 820's are taking over the class so the guys with a regular 100cc mac doesn't stand a chance. My engines can keep up but they need extensive mods.
Maybe an 820 without boost ports might be more fair rather than the fully modified Pro builds coming out.
I think it is unfair even with the 1" carb.

A famous drag racer once said that the only way to beat cubic inch is with cubic dollars and in this case he is right.
My 2 cents
Reply
#10
(07-17-2020, 10:55 AM)Scott Kneisel Wrote: Well,
I am a Mac guy and in my opinion, the 820 does not belong in the Sportsman rear class.
The pro built 820's are taking over the class so the guys with a regular 100cc mac doesn't stand a chance. My engines can keep up but they need extensive mods.
Maybe an 820 without boost ports might be more fair rather than the fully modified Pro builds coming out.
I think it is unfair even with the 1" carb.

A famous drag racer once said that the only way to beat cubic inch is with cubic dollars and in this case he is right.
My 2 cents

I remember a few years ago  at New Castle...I was running a pretty good Mac 90 in sportsman...was leading  app 9 karts...this karts pulls up next to me on the long straight,,,slows down and wants to bump fists...and then just motors away,,,not driving anu better, ,,,,nothing but motor,,,oh my,,it was an 820

gw
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)